Introduction to Chinese Dietary Therapy

Healthy mealIn summary, Chinese Dietary Therapy is guided by nature, instead of analysis of micro-nutrients as in western nutrition. Each food is assigned characteristics of taste, temperature, energetics, and which organs it most affects. Each food also has special medicinal properties. For example, walnuts are sweet, warm, and moistening to the lungs and intestines. Therefore walnuts can help with such issues as a dry cough or constipation. Another example which I personally find fascinating is that in one ancient Chinese text from 652 A.D., seaweed is prescribed for a patient with a goiter (a very large lump on the neck due to enlargement of the thyroid). Salty flavors are said to dissolve lumps and hardness in the body. We now know that iodine (naturally present in seaweed) deficiency is a cause of goiters. Amazing! This treatment pre-dates any western use of iodine therapy for goiters. Read more

Healthy and Easy- Miso

If you’ve ever been to a sushi restaurant, chances are you have tried Miso soup. Have you ever wondered what exactly Miso is made of? And why has it remained a daily staple of the Japanese and Chinese diet for centuries?

What is Miso? What are the health benefits of Miso?

Miso, before it’s added to broth, begins as a paste made of soybeans, cultured grain, and sea salt (although beans other than soy can be used.. keep reading). It is a naturally fermented food which contains health-giving probiotics. Probiotics are excellent for improving digestion, energy, immunity, and decreasing symptoms like bloating, flatulence, and constipation. Miso has also been shown to substantially reduce cancer risk. It is one of the few soy-containing items that I recommend consuming because it is minimally processed, retaining all those wonderful substances such as K2, all the amino acids, and antioxidants. Read more

How To Stay Grounded During a Stormy Fall

Feet on rocksFirst there was Superstorm Sandy, then the election, followed by a Nor’easter. It seems we haven’t had a second to catch our breath before now being launched into the holidays. Here’s how to get grounded, slow down, and regain your footing. In both Ayurveda and Chinese Medicine, rapid change and feelings of unsteadiness are attributed to the wind element (vata in Ayurveda). The opposing element is earth- grounded, stable, and certain. Read on for my top 5 tips to feel more grounded during times of change. Read more

7 Acupuncture Tips for a Healthy Fall

Below I have reposted an article by Sara Calabro of AcuTake. I find this to be a great article because it addresses how our seasonal health needs change from a physical and mental/emotional perspective. In an upcoming newsletter I will discuss my top tips for increasing your immunity this fall. Click here for the original link to the article. Enjoy!

“Fall officially begins this weekend. New seasons are an opportunity to assess our states of health and realign with our natural rhythms. From an acupuncture perspective, fall is about refinement. It’s time to pare down, to let go of the excesses we allowed ourselves in summer and focus on what’s necessary for winter. Read more

OPK’s vs. BBT Charting

When am I Ovulating? A Discussion on OPK’s vs BBT Charting

Many women become confused when their OPK’s (Ovulation Predictor Kits) and BBT’s (Basal Body Temperatures) don’t agree on the day of ovulation- understandably so. This is one of the more confusing topics I’ve researched! We’ll file this under “advanced topics”. Here’s why.

Background: What are OPK’s and BBT’s anyway?

OPK: Ovulation Predictor Kits are tests that you can get at most any drugstore which have the purpose of predicting ovulation. The idea is that they detect a hormone called LH, or Leuteinizing Hormone in the urine. Once they read positive, usually it’s safe to say that you’ll ovulate within 12-36 hours. Read more